Frosted Lucky Charms…

35018892The third, and apparently final, part of the Librarians tie-in books came out after the series ended (and there was much mourning among the fans).

As you might guess from the title, The Librarians and the Pot of Gold by Greg Cox deals with… leprechauns, banshees and faerie changelings. Oh, and the Brotherhood of Serpents (and remember, St Patrick drove the snakes from Ireland).

The Brotherhood, in the time of St Patrick, used an infant to force a Leprechaun to hand over his pot of gold. The Librarian interferes, and the Leprechaun escapes with the baby, while the Brotherhood loses one of their people, and the gold as well.

In the present time, a group is trying to track down the Leprechaun again, still wanting his pot of gold. Or more to the point, they want to pot for nefarious purposes. The Librarians, while trying to stop this plot, are also pulled into the case of an Irish style pub being plagued by a Banshee. Gee, could these events be connected.

The fun thing about the tv show was just how tongue in cheek it was (stealing Santa’s sled? Why not?). Greg Cox does a great job of matching that tone in his spinoff books. I just hope that Tor books will continue with the books, even if the TV show is gone,

Thanks to the publisher and Netgalley for letting me read this

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Summer reading in winter…

39971767Sometimes, reading a book can be the adventure you would like to go, if not for money or time or many other reasons.

Coves of Departure, by John Seibert Farnsworth, is more along the lines of the adventure that sounds cool, but hopefully wouldn’t be popular. Kayaking off the coast of Baja California to study delicate ecosystems. Travelling into the desert to observe buzzards. Things that sound intriguing, but it would be better for the environment that the average person didn’t do it. For that matter, I probably wouldn’t be able to handle the physical side of things.

Still, reading this book let me experience things second-hand, since Farnsworth definitely paints a vivid picture for the reader. I found myself sinking into the book, slowing down, as if I was reading it in a summer heat-wave instead of a cold winter. It also slowed me further as I took side-trips into the internet to look up the wildlife he describes

Very much recommended to anyone who loves reading about the environment. I look forward to seeing what the author does next.

Thanks to the publisher and Netgalley for letting me read this