Mice are really important, you know

31702736Note: This review includes minor spoilers. Read at your own risk.

Beggars in Spain has been my favorite Nancy Kress novel since back when it first came out, and one of my favorite social science fiction novels by any writer. Tomorrow’s Kin may have taken over for it. Mind you, the two novels have some elements in common, including the fact that both started as shorter pieces.

Tomorrow’s Kin takes a previous novella, Yesterday’s Kin, and spins it out. Basically, aliens come to Earth, but before to the start of the book, no one actually gets to see them. But now, an older geneticist (and how many books have a protagonist that is a grandmother?) is chosen to actually meet the aliens about the reason they came to Earth, which is a cloud of spores that will kill everyone on the planet. It turns out that the aliens are humans removed from Earth in the distant past for unknown reasons by unknown aliens, and the reason they came to Earth is that their world is in the path of the spores, but not until after Earth encounters it, so if a cure can be found, it will save them as well. Also, they want Dr. Marianne Jenner to find people who have their genome, since they want to meet their distant relatives (for reasons). It also turns out that her adopted son is one of those relative. (she has three children: a border patrol member who gets irate because the aliens are foreigners, and an environmentalist who is irate because of invasive species, and the youngest, a drug addict who is absorbed into the alien society).

This only covers the first third of the book, and then things get interesting. Turns out that the spores aren’t going to kill (many) people on Earth. However, when it comes, it wipes out most mice in the world, because they are vulnerable. This leads to a well thought out environmental disaster, followed by the innevitable economic disaster. Also, children after the spore cloud are born with either no hearing, or hypersensitive hearing.

The aliens left behind plans for space ships so that once they are built, Earth can come to their home, World. Only thing is, people think (in typical human prejudice) that if the aliens hadn’t shown up, all the bad wouldn’t happen. As a result, ships are being built, but the builders are planning to go attack World for revenge, because people seem to assume that the human aliens knew exactly what would happen and didn’t warn them about the other results of the spores. Personally, I think that attitude is asinine, but I can see it happening in the real world. Just look at the current political climate to see examples of this sort of thinking on both sides of the political divide.

But let’s avoid political debates, since they never turn out well.

The parts that fascinated me the most was the parts about the far-reaching effects of mice disappearing (kind of like the real world problems that could come from colony collapse among bees). And the whole business of the children with hyper hearing reminded me of the kids who don’t need to sleep in Beggars in Spain.

All in all, I thoroughly enjoyed the book, and I look forward to the other (forthcoming) two books in the trilogy.

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