Don’t get stepped on

34954246My first experience with what could be called Kaiju was the Godzilla cartoon (and Godzuuuuuuki… ignore the cries of horror) when I was a kid. My second was the Power Rangers series when I was in my twenties. The most recent was the latest Godzilla movie and Pacific Rim. I always thought they were fun, but not much more than that.

Giant Creatures in the World takes a long look at the Kaiju genre, and uses it as a reflection of the culture of the various times. While I doubt that producers were quite as deliberate as the essays might make it seem, they do make a good argument for a reflection between the movies and attitudes of the various times towards women, foreigners, the military, government and other subjects.

The essays in the collection were intriguing, covering from the era of the first Godzilla movie (and before by bringing in movies like King Kong as a predecesor) through to the far more recent Pacific Rim.

Unfortunately, there were a few quirks that brought down my enjoyment of the book. First of all, I think there was only one essay that didn’t include a variation on ‘this essay will discuss’, which made it feel a little like they all were written based on the college instructions on how to write an essay. The author bios make it clear that these aren’t college students, so couldn’t they have let the essays communicate on their own, without telling me explicitely what they intend to do?

There are also a few bad word choices scattered around. For example, an object does not revision something. Revision is a nown, not a verb. It might reinvision something, though. As well, there was one of my pet peeve homonym issues in that you ‘rein’ something in, not ‘reign’. A little more editing (and certainly copy-editing) would have helped a lot.

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What I’m reading this weekend

Ah, weekends. Aren’t they wonderful things

I finally finished listening to George Saunder’s¬†Lincoln in the Bardo, after working my way back to the top of the library wait list, a month and a half later. I’d been a little iffy about wanting to finish it, but the last 20% turned the whole book around for me. I have to say, though, the audiobook works much better than print for this story. Flipping through the paper book in the store, the jumping from voice to voice didn’t work as well in print as it does when dealing with a full-cast recording. I definitely recommend the audiobook for the story, which ended up completely different from what I expected.

So, my new audiobook is Churchill’s Ministry of Ungentlemanly Warfare: The Mavericks Who Plotted Hitler’s Defeat by Giles Milton. I’ve listened to the first chapter, and I’m looking forward to the rest. After all, I’ve really enjoyed other books about the stories of WWII that you don’t hear every day.

My current bathtub reading is another Executioner novel, 430: Deadly Salvage. This one includes Russian nukes and a sadistic billionaire with plans. Cheesy fun.

I’m about to finish a book of essays from NetGalley. Giant Creatures in Our World: Essays on Kaiju and American Popular Culture¬†tackles a trope that has been around for more than a half-century, if not a century: the Kaiju. Giant creatures that can be bad guys or good, depending on the story. And like Zombies, Kaiju movies can cover a multitude of commentaries on modern society, and the essays in this volume cover the gamut. I do have some problems with the writings, but I am enjoying the book as a whole.

And the other NetGalley book I’m reading is Girls Made of Glass and Snow by Melissa Bashardoust. It’s a fantasy novel with a new twist on Snow White.

And on the horizon from NetGalley are The Emerald Circus (short stories by Jane Yolen), Paradox Bound (a new novel from Peter Clines, a fantastic writer) and the book that made me do a happy dance when I was accepted, Artemis, the second novel from Andy Weir, author of The Martian.

47 years and counting…

28010373In recent months, I’ve got through a whole bunch of books in the Mack Bolan universe, which make for great bathtub reading due to pace and length. I figured I might as well do a post on the multiple series and their histories.

Mack Bolan has a long and bizarre history. The first novel was published in 1969 (!) by Pinnacle Books, written by Don Pendleton. In the series, Mack Bolan is a soldier in Vietnam who gets called home after his family is destroyed. It turns out that his father owed a loan shark a lot of money, and since he couldn’t pay for it, his daughter (Mack’s sister) was forced into prostitution. In shame, the father shoots his entire family and then committed suicide. The only survivor was the youngest, Johnny. When Mack finds out, he goes on a crusade to wipe out the Mafia, acquiring allies and enemies along the way.

People who read Marvel Comics are probably going ‘wait a second, that sounds an awful lot like The Punisher’. Well, the Punisher first appeared in 1974, five years after the Executioner. There have also been interviews that indicates that the creator of the Punisher was influenced by Don Pendleton’s books. Today, they probably would be sued for plagiarism.

Continue reading “47 years and counting…”

Mice are really important, you know

31702736Note: This review includes minor spoilers. Read at your own risk.

Beggars in Spain has been my favorite Nancy Kress novel since back when it first came out, and one of my favorite social science fiction novels by any writer. Tomorrow’s Kin may have taken over for it. Mind you, the two novels have some elements in common, including the fact that both started as shorter pieces.

Tomorrow’s Kin takes a previous novella, Yesterday’s Kin, and spins it out. Basically, aliens come to Earth, but before to the start of the book, no one actually gets to see them. But now, an older geneticist (and how many books have a protagonist that is a grandmother?) is chosen to actually meet the aliens about the reason they came to Earth, which is a cloud of spores that will kill everyone on the planet. It turns out that the aliens are humans removed from Earth in the distant past for unknown reasons by unknown aliens, and the reason they came to Earth is that their world is in the path of the spores, but not until after Earth encounters it, so if a cure can be found, it will save them as well. Also, they want Dr. Marianne Jenner to find people who have their genome, since they want to meet their distant relatives (for reasons). It also turns out that her adopted son is one of those relative. (she has three children: a border patrol member who gets irate because the aliens are foreigners, and an environmentalist who is irate because of invasive species, and the youngest, a drug addict who is absorbed into the alien society).

This only covers the first third of the book, and then things get interesting. Turns out that the spores aren’t going to kill (many) people on Earth. However, when it comes, it wipes out most mice in the world, because they are vulnerable. This leads to a well thought out environmental disaster, followed by the innevitable economic disaster. Also, children after the spore cloud are born with either no hearing, or hypersensitive hearing.

The aliens left behind plans for space ships so that once they are built, Earth can come to their home, World. Only thing is, people think (in typical human prejudice) that if the aliens hadn’t shown up, all the bad wouldn’t happen. As a result, ships are being built, but the builders are planning to go attack World for revenge, because people seem to assume that the human aliens knew exactly what would happen and didn’t warn them about the other results of the spores. Personally, I think that attitude is asinine, but I can see it happening in the real world. Just look at the current political climate to see examples of this sort of thinking on both sides of the political divide.

But let’s avoid political debates, since they never turn out well.

The parts that fascinated me the most was the parts about the far-reaching effects of mice disappearing (kind of like the real world problems that could come from colony collapse among bees). And the whole business of the children with hyper hearing reminded me of the kids who don’t need to sleep in Beggars in Spain.

All in all, I thoroughly enjoyed the book, and I look forward to the other (forthcoming) two books in the trilogy.